Steve's World Blog Information and articles on cities, towns and villages around the world.

August 17, 2016

Yoga an Overview

Filed under: Facts,Uncategorized,United Kingdom — Tags: , , — needahand @ 10:40 am

Yoga – If you have been thinking about taking yoga classes or perhaps even attending a yoga workshop, you might be looking for a little general information to get you up to speed on just what yoga is all about. Below is a short overview of what to look for and what you can expect from most yoga classes. Take a look around and see what is available in your area.

Yoga an Overview – Yoga is a gentle exercise system that is beneficial to both the spirit and body, it’s based upon early traditions from North India, stretching back in the region of 4,000 years. Yoga was introduced to the west from India in the late 19th and early 20th century. As an exercise method which can be used at any time of life and by those of all shapes and sizes, yoga is among the most beneficial low impact activities in which you can participate.

Yoga can help circulation by lowering blood pressure and lessening a person’s resting pulse rate while escalating core body strength and metabolic rate to help in improving body shape and accentuating muscle tone, consequently participating in a yoga class on a regular basis has a proven history of health and fitness improvements that can really help your general wellbeing and quality of life.

The emotional and mental health gains are also significant with yoga fans enjoying a reduction in cortisol, the stress hormone, whilst increasing dopamine levels to give a calm sensation of harmony and happiness. By means of meditation, self study, correct breathing, postural exercises, chanting yoga gives you the opportunity to enhance the spirit, mind and body.

One of the positive aspects of yoga is that to participate no special equipment is needed to join in, with loose, comfortable garments being all that’s needed for novices to participate in lessons. Nearly all yoga teachers can provide yoga mats and any further apparatus that is required for the yoga session so you don’t need to invest in these items. It is also suggested that you allow at least sixty minutes after eating before you take a yoga session because the activity can feel a bit uncomfortable on a full stomach.

If doing yoga with a group of people is not something you would enjoy, then you could contemplate the idea of private tuition where you can augment your yoga skills in your own home or perhaps in a private room, thus avoiding the distraction of others. Some yoga teachers offer this option as a means of giving an even more personal and beneficial yoga experience one-on-one.

So why not sign up for some local yoga classes and get started on gaining a new skill.

To learn more about yoga and how to find a good yoga class look here: http://www.yoganto.uk

September 14, 2015

Castile and Leon Spain

Filed under: Facts,Spain,Travel — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — needahand @ 4:20 pm

Castile and Leon Spain – Castile and Leon is an autonomous community of Spain, referred to as “historical community” and “culture” in its statute of autonomy. It was formally established in 1979 and acquired its full status in 1983. Its territory is located in the northern part of the plateau of the Iberian Peninsula and is largely corresponds to the Spanish area of the Douro river basin. It consists of 9 provinces: Leon, Avila, Segovia, Burgos, Salamanca, Palencia , Zamora, Valladolid and Soria. It is the largest autonomous region of Spain, with an area of 94,226 square kilometres, and the sixth most populous, with 2,519,875 inhabitants. Right from the start of the federalist debate in Spain in the nineteenth century, during the First Spanish Republic there were projects of autonomy for castellanoleonesa region, including the current regions of Cantabria and La Rioja, this continued during the Second Republic and finally took place after the Spanish Constitution of 1978, but did not include Cantabria and La Rioja.

August 21, 2015

Stowmarket Suffolk

Filed under: England,Facts,History,Travel,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , — needahand @ 11:56 am

Stowmarket Suffolk England: Stowmarket is a town of 15,059 inhabitants and is located in the county of Suffolk. This town is on the A14 between Bury St Edmunds and Ipswich and on the railway between London and Norwich. It is the largest town in Mid Suffolk, on the banks of the River Gipping which is joined by the River Rat further south. The town takes its name from “Stow” an Anglo-Saxon word meaning “main square”. Stowmarket received a charter to hold a market in 1347 from Edward III of England, which added the “market” suffix to the town’s name. Even today, a bi-weekly market is held on Thursdays and Saturdays. The county of Suffolk has an area of almost 1,500 square miles and a population of 730,000.

August 19, 2015

Catalonia Province Spain

Filed under: Costa Brava,Facts,Spain,Travel — Tags: , , , , — needahand @ 3:40 pm

Catalonia Province Spain – Catalonia is a Spanish autonomous community located in the north-east of the Iberian Peninsula. It occupies an area of about 32 000 square kilometres and is bordered to the north by France (Midi-Pyrenees and Languedoc-Roussillon) and Andorra, to the east by the Mediterranean Sea along a coastal strip of about 580 kilometres, south to the Valencian Community, and to the west with Aragon. This strategic location has nurtured a very intense relationship with the territories of the Mediterranean and continental Europe. Catalonia is composed of the four provinces of Tarragona, Barcelona, Lleida, and Girona, its capital is the city of Barcelona. Catalonia has a population of about 7.5 million people and a total of 948 municipalities of which two thirds live in the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Catalonia has a coastline on the Mediterranean Sea.

August 12, 2015

Andalucia Spain

Filed under: Costa del Sol,Facts,Spain,Travel — Tags: , , , , — needahand @ 3:33 pm

Andalucia Spain – The second largest of Spain’s autonomous communities, Andalucia lies in the extreme south of the country with coasts on both the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. This is a historic region and is a huge draw for tourists, both to explore its ancient cities and towns and to enjoy its wonderful climate and sandy beaches. Andalucia (Andalusia) comprises 8 provinces, and these are Seville, Jaen, Malaga, Huelva, Almeria, Cadiz, Cordoba and Granada. Andalucia cover a huge area of some 87,000 square kilometres (33,500 square miles) and has a population of eight and a half million. The name of the region originated from the Arabic language (Al-Andalus) and dates from the Moorish occupation of the Iberian Peninsula (during the 8th to 13th centuries). Andalucia has several well known coastal areas including the best known Costa del Sol, plus the Costa de la Luz, The Costa Almeria, and the Costa Tropical.

August 9, 2015

The Murcia Region of Spain

Filed under: Costa Calida,Facts,Spain,Travel — Tags: , , , — needahand @ 8:40 am
Mar Menor Murcia

The Mar Menor, Murcia

Murcia (Region) – The autonomous community of Murcia is sandwiched between the huge region of Andalusia and the region of Valencia, with an inland border with the Castile-La-Mancha region.

Murcia has a 150 mile coastline (commonly referred to as the Costa Calida), its capital is the city of the same name Murcia and it is one of the largest producers of fruit and vegetables in Europe.

The region of Murcia, especially the coastal part is a popular and growing area for tourism with many fine beach resorts, especially along the Mar Menor coast, with places like Los Alcazares and Lo Pagan among the most popular. There are also resorts in other areas to the south for instance Aguilas and Puerto Mazarron. The city of Murcia is the capital of the region and province, is the main shopping centre for the region and has many fine tourist attractions, such as the stunning Murcia Cathedral.

The region has a population of 1.4 million making it the 7th most populated of Spain’s provinces.

February 27, 2015

Kings Lynn Norfolk Review

Filed under: England,Facts,History,United Kingdom — Tags: , , — needahand @ 10:31 am

King’s Lynn Norfolk Review – The Georgian age endures in most of King’s Lynn in East Anglia, in a range of smart facades everywhere in the old heart of the town. And yet King’s Lynn, or ‘Lynn’ as it is most often called by natives, is far more olden than the eighteenth century. Lying on the east bank of the River Great Ouse, it was already a harbour by the time of the 1086 Domesday Book, at which time it was known as Luna or Lena It was granted a charter in 1204 by King John, and by thirteen forty seven it was prosperous enough to supply nineteen ships for the English fleet, at a time that London supplied twenty four.

In the Dark Ages the town was referred to as Bishop’s Lynn in fifteen thirty seven the title was altered to King’s Lynn by order of King Henry VIII. The church of St Margaret’s was originally constructed in around 1100, and it is an assortment of architectural styles, it has a ‘Gothic’ nave put up in the mid-18th century, as a storm sent the spire crashing down across the earlier nave. The Town Hall, near the church, was at first the Holy Trinity Guildhall, erected in the early 15th century.

King’s Lynn’s treasure is presented in the Regalia RoomsRooms in the medieval undercroft. The St George’s Guildhall, in King Street, was constructed in the early 14th century and is proclaimed to be the greatest medieval guildhall in the country to have survived undamaged. It is owned by the National Trust and serves as the HQ of Lynn’s annual summer time fair. The theatre in the upper area of the Guildhall carries on an ancient theatrical tradition, and it’s claimed that Shakespeare himself had performances there. Both the Guildhall and Town Hall are built of flint in an outstanding black and white chequer pattern.

Map of Norfolk East Anglia

June 9, 2012

Torquay Devon

Filed under: England,Facts,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , , , , — needahand @ 4:55 pm

Torquay is a town on the south coast of England, in the County of Devon and extending along the coast of Torbay. In the nineteenth century was known as the English Riviera for its healthy climate. Among the various origins of its name, the most accepted is the word torr or tower, Old English, and designating the small hills of southwest England. It is present in several names of Devon and Cornwall. Remains found in a rock known as “the face”, located in a cave called Kent, demonstrate that Roman troops arrived in Torquay when Britain belonged to the Roman Empire. The first construction of prominence in Torquay was Torre Abbey, a monastery founded in 1196. The favorable climate of Torquay attracted many visitors, especially to convalesce, and mostly coming from cold northern regions. The population of Torquay grew apace passing 838 inhabitants in 1801 to 11,474 in 1851. There are currently 70,214 people living in Torquay. Nearby resorts and towns include Paignton, Babbacombe and Teignmouth.

Find maps of Devon places here: http://www.my-towns.co.uk

March 31, 2012

Bilbao Spain Titles

Filed under: Facts,Spain — Tags: , , — needahand @ 4:34 pm

Bilbao Spain Titles – Bilbao boasts the category of historic town, with the titles of “Very Noble and Very Loyal and Invicta”. It was the Catholic Monarchs who awarded the title “Noble Town” on 20 September of 1475, according to the customs of the time, while Philip III of Spain, by letter dated 1603, gave the title Villa to the dictates and title of “Very Noble and Loyal. ” After the episode of the siege of Bilbao during the Carlist War, on the 25 December of 1836, the title of “Invicta” was added. The titles, the flag and the emblem of Bilbao are traditional symbols and are part of its heritage, being employed in the image of other cities, formal events, for identification and decoration of specific places or for the validation of documents.

View a handy Bilbao map here: http://www.needahandspanishproperties.com/bilbao-map.html

March 30, 2012

Bracknell Forest Berkshire

Filed under: England,Facts,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , , — needahand @ 4:26 pm

Bracknell Forest Berkshire – Bracknell Forest is a unitary authority and borough in the county of Berkshire in England. It includes in addition to the garden city of Bracknell with its administrative centre and the surrounding villages of Binfield, Crowthorne, Sandhurst, Warfield and Winkfield. The authority was established on 1 April 1974 as the District of Bracknell. In May 1988 it received the status of a Borough, and the name was changed to Bracknell Forest. Bracknell was formerly twinned with Opladen in Germany it is now twinned with Leverkusen. Surrounding Berkshire towns include Crowthorne, Wokingham, Binfield and Ascot.

See a map of Berkshire, England here: http://www.my-towns.co.uk/berkshire-map.html

March 25, 2012

Daya Nueva Alicante

Filed under: Costa Blanca,Facts,Spain — Tags: , , , , , , , — needahand @ 3:59 pm

Daya Nueva Alicante: Daya Nueva (in Valencian Daia Nova) is a municipality and town of Valencia, Spain. Located in the province of Alicante and the region of the Vega Baja del Segura (Low Fertile Valley of the River Segura), in the area to the left of the Segura River, east of Almoradi. The main economic activity of Daya Nueva has always been irrigated agriculture, producing citrus fruits, artichokes and potatoes. Currently the town has many shops and other businesses, and is gradually moving towards a more modern economy. Daya Nueva experiences a typical Mediterranean climate with sunny weather all year round. Daya Nueva has a population of 1,988 nearby town and villages include Daya Vieja, San Fulgencio, Almoradi, Dolores and Catral.

Learn more about the town of Daya Nueva here: http://www.needahandspanishproperties.com/daya-nueva.html

September 16, 2011

Es Castell Menorca

Filed under: Balearic Islands,Facts,Spain — Tags: , , — needahand @ 12:50 pm

Es Castell Menorca – Located at the mouth of Mahon’s port on the east coast of Menorca in the Spanish Balearic Islands, the seaside resort of Es Castell is a popular holiday destination which attracts many thousands of visitors each year especially during the traditional summer months (May to September). In what was previously a strategically important section of Menorca (the Brits overtook the port), it now attracts more attention from holidaymakers, who arrive to enjoy the sunny weather, the sandy beaches, and the friendly atmosphere. Es Castell which literally means “The Castle” has a somewhat English feel with a Georgian twist, harping back to the days of English rule, there is still an old parade ground which was used by troops in days gone by. Es Castell is gathered around two attractive coves and there is a small fishing harbour from which fishermen still operate today as they sail their boats on the waters of the Mediterranean Sea.

Get a map and info for Es Castell here: http://www.needahandspanishproperties.com/es-castell-map.html

And more info on Menorca here: http://www.needahandspanishproperties.com/menorca.html

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