Steve's World Blog Information and articles on cities, towns and villages around the world.

March 5, 2018

Visit Buckinghamshire

Visit Buckinghamshire England UK – If you like to visit rural locations you might be interested in a visit to the pretty county of Buckinghamshire, located to the north-west of London. Buckinghamshire is a historic county with wonderful countryside and some amazing places to visit. You might start with historic towns like Aylesbury or Amersham and maybe get some retail therapy at the new city of Milton Keynes which has some outstanding facilities. You could go for long bracing walks on the ever popular Wendover Hills and woods, part of the Chiltern Hills area. One of the most interesting places to visit is Bletchley Park where you can learn about the early story of computing and learn how the famous Enigma machine was developed to decode German messages during World War 2, a process which helped to end the war and secure victory for the Allies. If you like country houses, you should not forget to visit Waddesdon Manor, a stunning house built in the style of a French chateau. You might also like to pop along to Hughendon Manor, country home of former Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli, or maybe visit the Hellfire Caves nearby in West Wycombe, where meetings of the Hellfire Club took place in the 18th Century. If you are a train fan you could head for Quainton, where you will find the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre, a very popular attraction, especially for steam enthusiasts. Buckinghamshire has so many places of interest you will not know where to head next.

Find maps of Buckinghamshire towns and attractions here: http://www.buckinghamshire.mapamundo.uk/

September 4, 2013

Buckingham a Buckinghamshire Town

Filed under: England,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , , — needahand @ 6:38 pm

A busy town with a population of just over 12,000, the town of Buckingham was the former county town of Buckinghamshire, England, until replaced by Aylesbury during the eighteenth century. Founded in the 7th century Buckingham has had its charter to hold a market since 1554, it now holds markets on Tuesdays and Saturdays, attracting people from far and wide, much as it has done for centuries. Notable as being the location of one of only two private universities to exist in the UK (The University of Buckingham) the town is an important centre for education in the area. Buckingham is located to the north of the market town of Winslow and to the east of the city of Milton Keynes.

See maps of Buckinghamshire here: http://www.buckinghamshire-maps.co.uk/

December 6, 2010

Newport Pagnell Buckinghamshire

Filed under: England,History,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , — needahand @ 6:47 pm

A town which has now been virtually swallowed up by the ever growing Milton Keynes, Newport Pagnell is a historic town standing beside the River Ouzel in Buckinghamshire. Recorded as Neuport in the Domesday Book of 1086 this former Saxon settlement was taken over by the Normans and the Pagnell suffix was added later as the manor was taken over by the Pagnell family. A significant river crossing over the River Ouzel, the Tickford Bidge at Newport Pagnell, is the oldest constantly used iron bridge in the world, dating from 1810. For many years Newport Pagnell was where Aston Martin cars were built, though production has now been moved to Gaydon (Warks). Newport Pagnell has a population of around 15,000.

December 3, 2010

Gulliver’s Land Milton Keynes

Filed under: England,Travel,United Kingdom — Tags: , — needahand @ 8:10 pm

To entertain the kids on a visit to Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire, pay a visit to Gulliver’s Land, a children’s theme park, located at Newlands, just outside the town. Perfect for a day out especially when the weather is fine, Gulliver’s land boasts 7 distinct sections, Toy Land, Lilliput Land, Junior Discovery Cove, Adventure Land, Discovery Bay, Lilliput Land Castle and Main Street, and offers lots to keep the kids amused for a few hours. Standard entry prices fro 2010 are £13.50 for both adults and children, and a daily passport is £49.99. To find Gulliver’s Land, head for the Willen Lake area of Milton Keynes, and follow the brown Gulliver’s Land signposts.

See a map of Milton Keynes here: http://www.milton-keynes-map.my-towns.co.uk/

July 27, 2009

Buckinghamshire

A beautiful rural county to the north-west of London, Buckinghamshire is one of the traditional ‘Home Counties’ of south-eastern England. The county town of Buckinghamshire (normally just referred to as Bucks) is Aylesbury, situated fairly centrally within the county. Aylesbury however was not always the county town, this honour fell to Buckingham itself, which gave Buckinghamshire its name and was the primary town from 888 until replaced by Aylesbury during the 16th century. The name of the town and the county derives from that of a wealthy landowner named Bucca, and literally means “Bucca’s Home”. Buckinghamshire was originally a sub-division of the Kingdom of Mercia between the 6th and 12th centuries, though there were of course settlers here long before this, with many Roman remains being found throughout the region, for instance in High Wycombe where there was a Roman Villa in the 2nd century AD. The county features a mix of historic and modern towns, the most modern being the huge city of Milton Keynes, which is now a unitary authority separate from the control of Bucks County Council. Milton Keynes was originally just a small village, and the name was taken by the new town (so declared in 1967) which swallowed a number of towns and villages in the area such as Bletchley, Wolverton, Stoney Stratford and Newport Pagnell. The south of the county has some very affluent towns, many of which have become commuter towns for those working in London. In the extreme south, Marlow sits attractively on the banks of the River Thames, and is a popular tourist spot as well as a pretty town, barely spoilt by development, historically it was mentioned in the Domesday Book, and was later given by William the Conqueror to his Queen Mathilda. Other affluent towns in this part of Buckinghamshire include Beaconsfield, Amersham and Chesham. Beaconsfield is very pretty, and during the times of Queen Victoria became notable as the seat of PM Benjamin Disraeli. Beaconsfield sits close to the M40 motorway, making it a desirable though expensive commuter town. Beaconsfield is also notable as the burial place of some famous people including G K Chesterton and poet Edmund Waller. Amersham and Chesham sit together to the north of Beaconsfield, both are attractive towns with perhaps Amersham taking the edge, especially the area of the Old Town which has changed little over the centuries. Amersham has two separate areas the Old Town and Amersham on the Hill (locally called Top Amersham) where the railway station is situated. Both Chesham and Amersham are joined to Central London by the underground network, making them very popular with commuters. Chesham is situated in the Chess Valley and has had human settlement since 8,000 BC, historically it was known for its religious unrest and saw a number of burnings in the 16th century including that of Thomas Harding for being a heretic and a Lollard. Overall Bucks is a pretty rural county with few large towns and only one city (Milton Keynes) it comprises mostly small, pretty villages and attractive market towns, the rolling, green Chiltern Hills add to the attraction.

Visit a dedicated Aylesbury website here: http://www.my-aylesbury.co.uk

View a map of Buckinghamshire here: http://www.my-towns.co.uk/buckinghamshire-map.html

More maps here: http://www.buckinghamshire-maps.co.uk

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