Steve's World Blog Information and articles on cities, towns and villages around the world.

June 2, 2017

Princes Risborough Buckinghamshire

Filed under: England,Facts,History,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , — needahand @ 2:31 pm

Princes Risborough Buckinghamshire – The charming little town of Princes Risborough lies at the foot of the Chilterns in the county of Buckinghamshire in England. Princes Risborough is a historic market town which was settled long before the Norman conquest due to its ideal position on the route between the Icknield Way and the River Thames, providing easy access through a handy gap in the Chiltern Hills range. The weekly market dates from the reign of Henry VIII, when he bestowed a charter on the town enabling it to both hold a Thursday street market and also to hold two annual fairs, which have been held in the town ever since. The fairs are held in the months of May and October and are popular with the people of the town and from the many surrounding villages including Monks Risborough, Great Kimble, Little Kimble and Horsenden. Princes Risborough enjoys a temperate climate with weather influenced by the surrounding Chiltern Hills, it has a resident population of around 8,000 and is located roughly midway between Aylesbury (the county town of Buckinghamshire) and High Wycombe (see map).

March 21, 2012

Marlow Buckinghamshire England

Filed under: England,United Kingdom — Tags: , , , , , — needahand @ 11:39 am

Marlow Buckinghamshire England – Marlow (14,000 inhabitants, previously Great Marlow or Chipping Marlow ) is a small British town situated on the banks of the River Thames. Marlow lies on the River Thames next to the A 404, which intersects the north-east of the town with the A 4155. The town of High Wycombe is to the north, Maidenhead about 6 miles to the south, Reading is located 15 km to the southwest and to Heathrow airport in the southeast it is about 20 km. The town of Marlow is known for one of the oldest suspension bridges in Europe, designed by William Tierney Clark, it was built between 1829 and 1832. Marlow is a popular place for a walk along the River Thames, especially when the weather is fine. Also worth seeing is the church of All Saints. Marlow is a driving distance of about 5 miles from High Wycombe in the county of Buckinghamshire.

View a useful Marlow map here: http://www.my-towns.co.uk/marlow-map.html

December 7, 2010

Princes Risborough Buckinghamshire

Lying in a broad gap in the western Chilton Hills, the small town of Princes Risborough has a history going back to Anglo Saxon times and beyond, it was recorded in the Domesday Book, and the manor eventually passed to Edward the Black Prince, giving it the “Princes” part of its name.  Later Princes Risborough received its charter to hold a weekly market from Henry VIII in 1523, it also from this time held 2 annual fairs. This expanding town still has many thatched and timbered cottages in its historic centre, its brick market house is topped with a wooden cupola, the National Trust run manor house dates from the 17th century, it has a Jacobean staircase and 18th century wainscoting. Princes Risborough is situated roughly midway between Aylesbury and High Wycombe.

July 27, 2009

Buckinghamshire

A beautiful rural county to the north-west of London, Buckinghamshire is one of the traditional ‘Home Counties’ of south-eastern England. The county town of Buckinghamshire (normally just referred to as Bucks) is Aylesbury, situated fairly centrally within the county. Aylesbury however was not always the county town, this honour fell to Buckingham itself, which gave Buckinghamshire its name and was the primary town from 888 until replaced by Aylesbury during the 16th century. The name of the town and the county derives from that of a wealthy landowner named Bucca, and literally means “Bucca’s Home”. Buckinghamshire was originally a sub-division of the Kingdom of Mercia between the 6th and 12th centuries, though there were of course settlers here long before this, with many Roman remains being found throughout the region, for instance in High Wycombe where there was a Roman Villa in the 2nd century AD. The county features a mix of historic and modern towns, the most modern being the huge city of Milton Keynes, which is now a unitary authority separate from the control of Bucks County Council. Milton Keynes was originally just a small village, and the name was taken by the new town (so declared in 1967) which swallowed a number of towns and villages in the area such as Bletchley, Wolverton, Stoney Stratford and Newport Pagnell. The south of the county has some very affluent towns, many of which have become commuter towns for those working in London. In the extreme south, Marlow sits attractively on the banks of the River Thames, and is a popular tourist spot as well as a pretty town, barely spoilt by development, historically it was mentioned in the Domesday Book, and was later given by William the Conqueror to his Queen Mathilda. Other affluent towns in this part of Buckinghamshire include Beaconsfield, Amersham and Chesham. Beaconsfield is very pretty, and during the times of Queen Victoria became notable as the seat of PM Benjamin Disraeli. Beaconsfield sits close to the M40 motorway, making it a desirable though expensive commuter town. Beaconsfield is also notable as the burial place of some famous people including G K Chesterton and poet Edmund Waller. Amersham and Chesham sit together to the north of Beaconsfield, both are attractive towns with perhaps Amersham taking the edge, especially the area of the Old Town which has changed little over the centuries. Amersham has two separate areas the Old Town and Amersham on the Hill (locally called Top Amersham) where the railway station is situated. Both Chesham and Amersham are joined to Central London by the underground network, making them very popular with commuters. Chesham is situated in the Chess Valley and has had human settlement since 8,000 BC, historically it was known for its religious unrest and saw a number of burnings in the 16th century including that of Thomas Harding for being a heretic and a Lollard. Overall Bucks is a pretty rural county with few large towns and only one city (Milton Keynes) it comprises mostly small, pretty villages and attractive market towns, the rolling, green Chiltern Hills add to the attraction.

Visit a dedicated Aylesbury website here: http://www.my-aylesbury.co.uk

View a map of Buckinghamshire here: http://www.my-towns.co.uk/buckinghamshire-map.html

More maps here: http://www.buckinghamshire-maps.co.uk

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